60-Second Civics

Wednesday, August 04
   Daily civics quiz
In the 1930s, the Supreme Court found that the general welfare clause did not limit Congress to its enumerated powers but did state that spending must be limited to

 
 
 
 

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About the Podcast: 60-Second Civics is a daily podcast that provides a quick and convenient way for listeners to learn about our nation’s government, the Constitution, and our history. The podcast explores themes related to civics and government, the constitutional issues behind the headlines, and the people and ideas that formed our nation’s history and government.

60-Second Civics is produced by the Center for Civic Education. The show's content is primarily derived from the Center’s education for democracy curricula, including We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, Foundations of Democracy, and Elements of Democracy.

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You Can Help: 60-Second Civics is supported by private donations. You can help keep the podcasts coming by donating, buying an ebook, or by writing a nice review in iTunes to help others discover the show. We love our listeners. You are the reason we created the podcast. Thank you for your kind support!

Music:
The theme music for 60-Second Civics is provided by Cheryl B. Engelhardt. You can find her online at cbemusic.com. The song featured on the podcast is Cheryl B. Engelhardt's "Complacent," which you purchase on iTunes, along with all of Cheryl's music.


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60-Second Civics: Episode 4401, Supreme Court Decisions about the General Welfare Clause: American Fundamentals, Part 24
People disagree over what powers the general welfare clause gives Congress to spend taxes. Under our Constitution, the Supreme Court of the United States is given the power to interpret the meaning of the Constitution. Learn more about how the Court has interpreted these powers in today's episode!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4400, The Debate Over the General Welfare Clause: American Fundamentals, Part 23
Even before the Constitution was ratified in 1788, people disagreed over what powers the Constitution gives to Congress to promote "the general Welfare." The topic is still debated today.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4399, The Meaning of "General Welfare" in the Constitution: American Fundamentals, Part 22
The Preamble to the U.S. Constitution states that one of its purposes is to promote the general Welfare. Article I, Section. 8. 1. of the Constitution says "The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States."

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4398, Shays' Rebellion and the U.S. Constitution: American Fundamentals, Part 21
As the Annapolis Convention met in September 1786, to ???Remedy Defects of the Federal Government,??? Shays' Rebellion had just begun. This extensive, sometimes bloody conflict began in Massachusetts began in August 1786 and stretched into 1787.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4397, Farmers' Demands, Debt, and Social Disorder: American Fundamentals, Part 20
By the mid-1780s, acts of violence protesting the poor economic conditions for American farmers had become commonplace. Farmers had borrowed money to raise crops to support the high demand during the Revolutionary War.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4396, Social Disorder After the Revolutionary War: American Fundamentals, Part 19
Social disorder after the Revolutionary War was caused mainly by economic conflict between farmers and merchants.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4395, How Does the Constitution Provide for Domestic Tranquility? American Fundamentals, Part 18
The Preamble to the Constitution states that one of its purposes is to "insure domestic Tranquility." What does this term mean, and why was it included in the Preamble?

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4394, The Corrective Form of Justice: American Fundamentals, Part 17
When a person has been convicted of a criminal or civil violation, how do we deal with the perpetrator?

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4393, The Procedural Form of Justice: American Fundamentals, Part 16
Procedural justice is the fairness of how information is gathered and how decisions are made. This concept is central to the American constitutional system.

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4392, The Distributive Form of Justice: American Fundamentals, Part 15
The concept of justice has long been divided into three types: distributive justice, procedural justice, and corrective justice. In today's episode, we'll cover the first type: distributive justice.

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